The “Hail Mary” Shoe

At the risk of kicking this blog post off with a major understatement, fall is basically like Christmas for college football fans. For many avid football enthusiasts across our state, it’s even better when the Irish are actually winning!

pile of running shoes

Everyone knows Notre Dame football is steeped in history, including “The House That Rockne Built.” You don’t have to even be a Fighting Irish fan to know one of the really cool things about the stadium is seeing “Touchdown Jesus” from inside. Something not many people realize—since they’re so busy looking at the touchdown-signaling arms—is that Touchdown Jesus is sporting Hail Mary shoes!

Fine, that’s not really the case. (He’s wearing sandals, but let’s not get sidetracked talking about problems that can develop when your sandals don’t have sufficient arch support!)

What are our “Hail Mary” shoes? To put it simply, these are our last resort when it comes to saving a foot before we have to recommend surgery. These shoes have extra depth – they can fit a foot and three golf balls in them! Now, you won’t be cramming golf balls in there, but the depth is perfect for putting in diabetic inserts, protecting a deformed foot, and making sure your feet aren’t rubbing against the insides (which can cause blisters that might break down into diabetic ulcers).

So what does that have to do with football? Well, just in case you’re not a fan, a Hail Mary pass is one wherein the situation for a team looks dire, so the quarterback puts the ball up in the air and hopes for the best. (The phrase is attributed to Dallas Cowboys great Roger Staubach, who was a practicing Roman Catholic, when he said he “closed [his] eyes and said a Hail Mary” when passing the ball for a game-winning touchdown.)

A key difference between Hail Mary shoes and Hail Mary passes is that the shoes work about 80-90% of the time, whereas the quarterback’s throw only works maybe around 5-10% of the time.

Admittedly, our Hail Mary shoes are more “function” than “form.” They come in any color you want… as long as you want shoes that are black, brown, or beige. If you have diabetes and we’re prescribing these shoes, however, the concern certainly needs to be more on shoe performance instead of shoe appearance.

If your health isn’t reason enough to invest in Hail Mary shoes—after other protective and preventative measures have been ruled out—you may want to consider the fact an Arizona study showed that every $1 spent on diabetic shoes would otherwise cost $70 in surgery or amputation (and that doesn’t even include complications from the surgery or living without the affected limb). Hopefully that helps you see that the costs of surgery will add up quickly!

Diabetes is a dangerous disease. The effects on your feet—as we’ve noted elsewhere on our blog and website—are very concerning, and especially when you factor in the high mortality rate of diabetic foot ulcers. If you have this condition, you simply must make diabetic foot care a priority. For more information on the services we provide, give us a call at (317) 545-0505.
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